Nest Dragging

When I was told I would be nest dragging this week I pictured me dragging a a nest away from it mother. Well that is not what happened. We tied a long rope along our waists and walked ten miles in knee-deep water. As the rope dragged along the tall vegetation the nesting birds would flush. This would allow us to pinpoint the location of the nest. By the end of the days I was able to identify the nests of Red-winged Blackbirds, Coots, Western Meadowlarks, and Wilson’s Phalaropes.

Now that the amount of shorebirds at the wetlands has windled down to only a handful, I have focused my attention on another critical bird.. The South Western Flycatcher. These surveys take place from 4 a.m-6a.m. As an afternoon person, surveys this early in the morning where really hard for me. Although I was exhausted and ready go back to sleep, I enjoyed watching the sunrise that morning. After a five hour nap, I got up and prepared to go on an amphibian (frog) survey from 8p.m to 2a.m. The light from the full moon guided our way into the different survey areas. Although we where unable to see any of the frogs, we did learn to identify the calls of four different frogs: Chorus Frog, Great Plains Toad, Leopard Frog, and the American Bullfrog.

Nest Dragging

Nest Dragging

Red-winged Blackbird Nest

Red-winged Blackbird Nest

Nest Dragging

Nest Dragging

All Suited up!

All Suited up!

Western Meadowlark Nest

Western Meadowlark Nest

Wilson's Phalarope Nest

Wilson’s Phalarope Nest

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