The Newcomers

I don’t know about you, but I’m tired of hearing about myself in this blog. So, to shake things up for a change, thought you may be interested in a new subject: the up-and-coming professionals of the natural resources world. I hope you have your rain gear ready, because these youngins are taking the field by storm.

On Monday we introduced the following young professionals to the community served by one of our partners, Lincoln City Development Corporation. The panel was meant to highlight the career paths of young scientists trying to break into the natural resources field as a means to offer advice, insight, and inspiration for the tenants of a housing project. The event was intimate: we had only a few guests, but those who showed up had a high interest in the endeavors of our panelists, and our panelists were nothing short of amazing. The partner is interested in hosting similar events in the future. It is my hope that this is beginning of a community of sharing, where professionals can turn around and offer a hand to the next generation of scientists.

With no further ado, I present our panelists:

Meagan Campbell, Wildlife Education Coordinator, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

This native Oregonian is a self-proclaimed enthusiast for the outdoors, a title well befitting of her passion for nature, wildlife, and expertise in environmental education. In her hometown of Eugene, Meagan often engaged in outdoor pursuits with her family, leading her to pursue a degree in Environmental Studies and Spanish from the University of Oregon. The formational experience of her career was an internship with the Bureau of Land Management, where she got to use her talent for the communication of science to implement education programs at Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area. Meagan went on to marry her love of nature, Latin American culture, and community development with her work with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. As a Program Coordinator, Meagan visits schools to teach children about the migrations of shorebirds from Latin America. Also, Meagan conducts public outreach, park interpretation, and fieldwork.

Dylan Beorchia, Botanist, Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area

Dylan has always held a fascination for plants. In Idaho, he learned about the biology of plants and quickly developed an intimate understanding of the medicinal, nutritional, and practical uses of different plant species. He went on to study Botany at Oregon State University and to serve as a WOOOF volunteer for organic farms in the United States. Dylan currently coordinates initiatives to protect the native flora of a Bureau of Land Management Natural Conservation Land. He impresses the staff on a daily basis with his profound knowledge of flowers, trees, grasses, and marine plants found within the park. Dylan will soon be entering the Peace Corps to work in sustainable agriculture in Senegal.

Bethany Cronin, Aquarist, Recipient of a Certification in Aquarium Studies from the Oregon Coast Community College

Bethany has traveled great distances to pursue her passion for marine biology as an aquarist. While working on her Bachelor’s of Science in Wildlife Biology from Missouri State University, Bethany took an internship with the Dickerson Park Zoo. This first internship was a launching pad of adventure, from which she would continue to take internships in zoos and aquariums like the Henry Doorly Aquarium in Omaha, Nebraska and the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago. She is currently stationed in Newport as a student with the Oregon Coast Community College Aquarium Science Program and working as a Student Intern and Aquarist with the Hatfield Marine Science Center. Her expertise in the care of aquarium animals and inviting personality makes Bethany a wonderful aquarist! She expects to continue pursuing her passion in Springfield, Missouri at the Wonder of Wildlife Museum & Aquarium.

Rolando Beorchia, Biology Technician (Plants), Yaquina Head Outstanding Natural Area

Rolando has always held a fascination for plants, their structures and how they interact with other organisms. In Idaho, he studied Biology at the College of Southern Idaho earning an Associates of Science degree. He went on to graduate from Oregon State University with a Bachelors of Science in Botany. Rolando worked for two years in the Pankaj Jaiwsal lab at OSU working as a lab technician with bioinformatics and researching the genes responsible for environmental stress responses in Populus trichocarpa (black cottonwood). He has volunteered time through World Wide Opportunities in Organic Farming (WWOOF) at multiple farms around western Oregon and with Growth International Volunteer Excursions (GIVE) building a school in Nicaragua.

Rolando currently coordinates initiatives to promote awareness of the importance of the native flora and manage invasive flora encroaching on the Bureau of Land Management Natural Conservation Lands. He impresses visitors on a daily basis with his knowledge of flowers, trees, grasses, and marine algae found within the park. Rolando will soon be leaving with the Peace Corps to work in sustainable agriculture in Senegal.

Alessandra Jimenez, Research Experience Undergraduate Intern, Oregon State University

Alessandra is an East coaster with roots in three different continents! Born and raised in Miami, Florida, Alessandra learned about the cultures of China and Panama through her mother. Elements of her background and natural disposition towards the sciences led her to fly west to Washington, where she now studies Biology in Whitworth University. Alessandra is a Research Experience Undergraduate scholar hosted by the Seabird Oceanography Lab of Oregon State University. This internship is National Science Foundation program that allows students to do research projects under the mentorship of university professors across the country. Alessandra’s is on the diet of seabirds that inhabit coastal rocks.

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