Those Who Take Care of Us

Robin Wall Kimmerer said something in her book that has caught my attention ever since I read it. She said, “In some Native languages the term for plants translates to ‘those who take care of us.”

While I was in the wilderness with my group walking through trees, snow, and swamps, what Kimmerer saying replayed in my mind as I watched in awe the nature around us. It was as she said. I felt secure when there were trees around to help me from falling into the snow or when there were hidden streams that magically appear whenever we needed to fill our water bottles. It was comforting being with mother nature because she showed us many wonders every day. Many of us felt stress, fear, and discomfort since we were so far from our homes, also, since many of us had wounds that kept us from wanting to move forward. I can tell you one of the things I saw on this journey that amazed me and it was how we never gave up even in our most vulnerable state.

Another thing Kimmerer said in her book that amazes me is, “the land knows you, even when you are lost.” It is hard to do things you aren’t used to but when we felt like we couldn’t do no more we had much support from our instructors and group members. When you are in the wilderness, the earth fills you up will positivity because there was nothing concerning about nature that kept us together in hard times. When finishing reading Braiding Sweetgrass it only made me think good things during my experience in the wilderness. I accepted nature as my mother and many of my group members did too.

Arely Mendia
[email protected]
No Comments

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

%d bloggers like this: